Comments on: Religion Re-Envisioned in D&D 4E (Part I) http://www.neuroglyphgames.com/religion-reenvisioned-in-4e-part-i A D&D 4e Blog Dedicated to Dungeonmasters & Players Mon, 07 Jul 2014 09:54:57 -0400 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.8.4 hourly 1 By: Dave http://www.neuroglyphgames.com/religion-reenvisioned-in-4e-part-i/comment-page-1#comment-3237 Dave Wed, 23 Feb 2011 01:48:50 +0000 http://www.neuroglyphgames.com/?p=4736#comment-3237 I agree that there is a tendency to set our modern morals and sensibilities into our game worlds without even realizing it many times.. Dave I agree that there is a tendency to set our modern morals and sensibilities into our game worlds without even realizing it many times..

Dave

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By: All the News You’ve Already Read « mim & dave http://www.neuroglyphgames.com/religion-reenvisioned-in-4e-part-i/comment-page-1#comment-3178 All the News You’ve Already Read « mim & dave Sun, 20 Feb 2011 01:30:14 +0000 http://www.neuroglyphgames.com/?p=4736#comment-3178 [...] pitched at a D&D 4e audience, Neuroglyph Games’ intriguing look at religion (beginning here and here) can easily apply to any fantasy [...] [...] pitched at a D&D 4e audience, Neuroglyph Games’ intriguing look at religion (beginning here and here) can easily apply to any fantasy [...]

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By: Editor-in-Chief http://www.neuroglyphgames.com/religion-reenvisioned-in-4e-part-i/comment-page-1#comment-3054 Editor-in-Chief Wed, 16 Feb 2011 23:11:57 +0000 http://www.neuroglyphgames.com/?p=4736#comment-3054 You bring up some very good points, and I'll agree one should not necessarily try to interpret too much historical religious context into a D&D game. But I do think that GMs have a tendency (myself included) to treat religion and religious influences toward politics in much the same way in their campaign as we do in our modern society. I hope in this series of blogs to address ways to offer a different fantasy gaming take on religion, temples, the priesthood and so forth, which might make for a more interesting campaign environment. You bring up some very good points, and I’ll agree one should not necessarily try to interpret too much historical religious context into a D&D game. But I do think that GMs have a tendency (myself included) to treat religion and religious influences toward politics in much the same way in their campaign as we do in our modern society. I hope in this series of blogs to address ways to offer a different fantasy gaming take on religion, temples, the priesthood and so forth, which might make for a more interesting campaign environment.

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By: Dave http://www.neuroglyphgames.com/religion-reenvisioned-in-4e-part-i/comment-page-1#comment-3034 Dave Wed, 16 Feb 2011 02:12:21 +0000 http://www.neuroglyphgames.com/?p=4736#comment-3034 One must be careful in transposing real history into gaming. Namely to be sure that you arew using the historical epoch correct for the feel of your game. Yes, for many centuries the Roman Catholic Church affected the politics of much of europe while the newer muslim sect took hold in parts of africa and arabia. However, in the time before Christ and Muhamad, organized religion held little control of politics. Individual temples sometimes held a vital role. Greek city-states sent officials to ask for divine guidance from the Oracle at Delphi and the king of Sparta withheld sending his whole army to face the invasion and instead took a delayed force to Thermopoli because of a divine holy week and a divine proclimation that a king would die. My point being that before the world became polarized with single, powerful religious organizations church and state were usually seperated. You can see this effect in Japan where local shinto beliefs have lived side by side with buddist beliefs for many centuries. Christianity moved there very late, and islam even later. The focal point is when a sect claims theirs is the only true god. They either triumph and recruit everyone or go under quickly. That being said, I have always had alliances of temples backing the various governments of my game worlds. Sometimes behind the scenes, and sometimes openly like in Port City where the Mitra priests and holy warriors have police powers within the city limits. In fact, I am an old sc hool guy that believes in different gods for different races. Thus I have ejected the official 4E gods for the pantheons from my original campaign I ported over from a different game system. Each gnome clan has two primary dieties they worship and changing one out is a big deal. Who they worship affects their relations with the outside world. The elevs have a pantheon of gods but one main "church" (the Twilight Order). Elven clergy are dedicated to all their gods until they reach paragon status and decide they want to dedicate the rest of their life to only one specific elf god. Dwarves and humans tend to pick from a list, each region having favorites and there is some overlap. Werne (my halflings) have a monothestic church and "one true werne god" the Mother Light but have four powerful lesser gods called Celestial Saints so in truth they kinda have a pantheon. My current group of players has no religious types at all. Maybe they wanted to avoid the temple politics I often slip into the campaigns. I wonder if that should be a hint to me in some fashion.... One must be careful in transposing real history into gaming. Namely to be sure that you arew using the historical epoch correct for the feel of your game.

Yes, for many centuries the Roman Catholic Church affected the politics of much of europe while the newer muslim sect took hold in parts of africa and arabia.

However, in the time before Christ and Muhamad, organized religion held little control of politics. Individual temples sometimes held a vital role. Greek city-states sent officials to ask for divine guidance from the Oracle at Delphi and the king of Sparta withheld sending his whole army to face the invasion and instead took a delayed force to Thermopoli because of a divine holy week and a divine proclimation that a king would die.

My point being that before the world became polarized with single, powerful religious organizations church and state were usually seperated. You can see this effect in Japan where local shinto beliefs have lived side by side with buddist beliefs for many centuries. Christianity moved there very late, and islam even later.

The focal point is when a sect claims theirs is the only true god. They either triumph and recruit everyone or go under quickly.

That being said, I have always had alliances of temples backing the various governments of my game worlds. Sometimes behind the scenes, and sometimes openly like in Port City where the Mitra priests and holy warriors have police powers within the city limits.

In fact, I am an old sc hool guy that believes in different gods for different races. Thus I have ejected the official 4E gods for the pantheons from my original campaign I ported over from a different game system. Each gnome clan has two primary dieties they worship and changing one out is a big deal. Who they worship affects their relations with the outside world. The elevs have a pantheon of gods but one main “church” (the Twilight Order). Elven clergy are dedicated to all their gods until they reach paragon status and decide they want to dedicate the rest of their life to only one specific elf god. Dwarves and humans tend to pick from a list, each region having favorites and there is some overlap. Werne (my halflings) have a monothestic church and “one true werne god” the Mother Light but have four powerful lesser gods called Celestial Saints so in truth they kinda have a pantheon.

My current group of players has no religious types at all. Maybe they wanted to avoid the temple politics I often slip into the campaigns. I wonder if that should be a hint to me in some fashion….

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By: Jason Dawson http://www.neuroglyphgames.com/religion-reenvisioned-in-4e-part-i/comment-page-1#comment-3008 Jason Dawson Tue, 15 Feb 2011 02:28:24 +0000 http://www.neuroglyphgames.com/?p=4736#comment-3008 Oh, I really like where you're going with this. Please keep going. I'm percolating very similar things for my next game and my campaign world of Brittanis, so I'll be following this eagerly. Oh, I really like where you’re going with this. Please keep going. I’m percolating very similar things for my next game and my campaign world of Brittanis, so I’ll be following this eagerly.

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